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Two Ways of Seeing: William Eggleston & Philippe Halsman

MOST OF WILLIAM EGGLESTON'S photographs are untitled, so I play a game sometimes and give them titles of my own. What you see above is officially called Untitled, 1974 (Biloxi, Mississippi), also sometimes unofficially called Red-Haired Girl, but I call it Girl Paying for Something at Concession Stand. I don’t know. It’s just what came to … Continue reading Two Ways of Seeing: William Eggleston & Philippe Halsman

John Steinbeck’s Search for America

TRAVELS WITH CHARLEY is the “non-fictional” account of Steinbeck’s road trip across America in 1960. (I put the word “non-fictional” in quotes because although Steinbeck portrayed his journey as a cut-and-dry retelling of actual events, much scrutiny has been put to its authenticity in recent years.) Steinbeck’s son has said in interviews about the book, … Continue reading John Steinbeck’s Search for America

Fantastic Mr. Fox is the Best Wes Anderson Film, Part 2: Who am I, Kylie?

IF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF Mr. Fox’s journey is exhumed during his confrontation with the wolf, everything leading up to it takes on a relatable form. The opening scene particularly becomes more than just a piece of information that moves the story along: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Efp1jidXWXA This scene is the prototypical nightmare for any modern person fearing the trappings … Continue reading Fantastic Mr. Fox is the Best Wes Anderson Film, Part 2: Who am I, Kylie?

Fantastic Mr. Fox is the Best Wes Anderson Film, Part 1: I Have a Phobia of Wolves

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELqdLvz60zA I WANT TO TREAT this scene as a first stepping stone in a series of reflections. I have an uphill battle to fight: I want to make case that Fantastic Mr. Fox—often overlooked or dismissed as a kid’s movie—is actually Wes Anderson’s best film, and is one of the most important films of the … Continue reading Fantastic Mr. Fox is the Best Wes Anderson Film, Part 1: I Have a Phobia of Wolves

The True Believer: A Common Sense Book for Politically Weird Times

1. Reductio ad Hitlerum is a pseudo-Latin term coined by Leo Strauss in 1951, which was a funny way of pointing to a growing trend in political argumentation within the U.S. and Europe after WWII. Rather than thinking carefully through the complexity of political theory, it was becoming increasingly common to dismiss a political opinion, or … Continue reading The True Believer: A Common Sense Book for Politically Weird Times